20 Fresh jQuery Plugins For Web development

jQuery is one popular Javascript library, and for good reasons! It’s easy to use, flexible, and most of all there’s a lot of jQuery tutorials and plugins available out, they are making the creation of dynamic effects much easier without using fx. flash. jQuery has become one of the most used JavaScript libraries today and can be found in the core of popular products like WordPress, joomla and Drupal.

So this post collection of the amazing latest jQuery plugins resources and tutorials that can add a spark of creativity into your web design.

1. FacyBox – jQuery Based Facebook/FancyBox Style Lightbox

FacyBox is a jQuery-based, Facebook/Fancybox-style lightbox which can display images, divs, or entire remote pages. Basically it is a FaceBox with FancyBox look.

FacyBox – jQuery Based Facebook/FancyBox Style Lightbox

2. jQuery Infinite Carousel Plugin

Unlike most carousel plugins which stop when they get to the last image, jQuery Infinite Carousel Plugin allows the show to go on infinitely without any user intervention.

jQuery Infinite Carousel Plugin

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jQTouch For Mobile Web Development

jqTouch ( http://www.jqtouch.com/ )  is a jQuery plugin that allow you to create web applications for devices containing mobile WebKit browsers like iPhone, G1, and Pre. Now you can easily create great looking application for these devices using only HTML, CSS & JavaScript.

QTouch provides native animations, automatic navigation, and themes. You can easily customize jQTouch through various options such as: enable full screen, style the status bar when running as a full screen, set icon, automatic glossy button effect on icon, image preloading and several more.

Developed by David Kaneda; jQTouch is available for download under MIT License.  You can find further information, demo & download on jQTouch’s Website.

jQTouch’s Websit: http://www.jqtouch.com/

15 jquery slider plugin

I found these plugins very useful for the web development. so i  am sharing

1.  jQuery plugin – Easy Image or Content Slider | Css Globe

2.  Scroll your HTML with jquery scrollable

3.  Creating a Slick Auto-Playing Featured Content Slider

4.  Accessible News Slider: A jQuery Plugin

5.  s3Slider jQuery plugin – Overview

6.  Create a Slick and Accessible Slideshow Using jQuery

7. jQuery Image Gallery/News Slider with Caption

8. New jQuery plugin: imgPreview – James Padolsey

9. CrossSlide – A jQuery plugin to create pan and cross-fade animations

10. JQuery Cycle Plugin

11. Simple jQuery Image Slideshow with Semi Transparent Caption

12. Slider Gallery

13. Create Beautiful jQuery Slider

14. Supersized

15. Smooth Div Scroll

Customize WordPress theme to match an existing website – A Step-by-Step Blog Integration Tutorial

A step by step blog integration tutorial that shows how to customize WordPress’s default theme to make it match an existing website.

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5 WP Ecommerce Plugins+Tutorials And Resources

WP e-Commerce

It is the most powerful free WordPress Ecommerce plugin. It integrates with a lot of payment options and designers may easily tweak the look and feel of the website by utilizing WordPress PHP template tags, shortcodes, and widgets. Besides these, WP e-Commerce has a complete documentation and beginners are easy to get started with it.

eShop

eShop is an accessible shopping cart plugin for WordPress, packed with various features. It can handles downloadable products and supports various payment options such as Paypal, Payson, eProcessingNetwork, Webtopay and Cash/Cheque.

YAK for WordPress

It is an open source WordPress plugin for Ecommerce. It supports posts and pages as products and uses categories to handle different type of products. YAK supports different payment options too. Basic documentation is free while the advance useages documentation costs $20.

Shopp

Shopp is a premium WordPress plugin for Ecommerce solution. You will have complete control over the shopping experience, which mean you can customize the design with stylesheets and WordPress PHP tags. The documentation is pretty complete, and you can get more supports from the community via the support forums.

WordPress Simple Paypal Shopping Cart Plugin

This simple plugin lets users add an “Add to cart” button anywhere on the blog. Customers can view their items from the shopping cart page.

Tutorials And Resources

1. Create an eCommerce Website with WordPress in under 5 minutes – A video tutorial from WordPress.tv that teach you about how to create an Ecommerce website with WordPress and the WP e-Commerce plugin.

2. Getting set up with the WP e-Commerce plugin: settings and configuration – Another video tutorial which walks you through the process of getting set up with the WP e-Commerce plugin.

3. How to Build an Online Store With WordPress – A simple tutorial on how to use Ecommerce Themes from iThemes to built your own online store.

4. How To Open An Online Store With WordPress In Less Than 30 Minutes – Shows you how to built and create an online store with WordPress in less than 30 minutes. It is very suitable for beginners.

5. WP e-Commerce SEO Tutorial – This SEO tutorial is designed to show you how to optimize WP e-Commerce for maximum traffic from the search engines.

6. WP e-Commerce Review For WordPress

70 PHP Tutorials at Its best

  1. Introduction To PHP
  2. Using HTML Forms With PHP
  3. Adding records to a MySQL database using PHP
  4. Setting Up Apache, PHP & MySQL On Windows
  5. Creating a PHP Looping Statement
  6. Introduction to PHP Variables
  7. Using PHP Operators
  8. Using Variable Referencing
  9. Working with PHP Datatypes
  10. File I/O in PHP
  11. What is Object Oriented Programming (OOP)?
  12. Convert Images to Thumbnails Images Using PHP
  13. PHP by example, Part I
  14. PHP By Example, Part 2
  15. Sorting an Array in PHP
  16. Putting PHP & MySQL To Work
  17. Generate Random Quotes with PHP
  18. How To Upload Files Using PHP
  19. A Class for Validating and Formatting Dates
  20. How Many Users Online?
  21. How to Show Random Images from a Folder
  22. Replacing Text in a MySQL Database Using PHP
  23. How To Backup Your MySQL Database With PHP
  24. Google Suggest With PHP
  25. Track Your Visitors, Using PHP
  26. PHP and Cookies, A Good Mix!
  27. Control Structures and While Loops
  28. Hightlight or Censor Words in PHP
  29. How to make a Hit Counter with PHP
  30. Basic Control Structures in PHP
  31. Developing a Login System with PHP and MySQL
  32. Upload Files to MySQL using PHP Tutorial
  33. PHP and MySql with PayPal
  34. Inserting An Array Into A Database
  35. Calculating Difference Between Two Dates Using PHP
  36. Programmatically Deciding Which Database to Connect in PHP
  37. Saving PHP Session Data to a Database
  38. Using Control Structures and Foreach Loops in PHP
  39. Storing Images in a Database
  40. Displaying Load Time with PHP
  41. Creating and Accessing MySQL Data with PHP
  42. Developing a Login System with PHP and MySQL
  43. Site Personalization With PHP
  44. How to Handle a Many-to-Many Relationship with PHP and MySQL
  45. Using PHP Objects to Access Your Database Tables (Part 1)
  46. Using PHP Objects to Access Your Database Tables (Part 2)
  47. The Explode Function, Split a String by String
  48. PHP Caching to Speed up Dynamically Generated Sites
  49. How to Setup and use Printing Variables in PHP
  50. Creating an Image Gallery with PHP
  51. Anti-Automated Registration
  52. Creating a Drop Down Selection with an Array
  53. Customizing the PHP Error Handler
  54. Checking Form Field Integrity within PHP
  55. Password Protection and File Inclusion With PHP
  56. How to Setup Variable Scope and Global Declarations
  57. Creating Dynamic Text Images
  58. Perfect PHP Pagination
  59. Image Manipulation with PHP The GD Libraries
  60. Simplified Image Resizing with PHP
  61. Verify a User’s Email Address Using PHP –
  62. Storing Hierarchical Data in a Database
  63. Managing Users with PHP Sessions and MySQL
  64. Generate PDFs with PHP
  65. Advanced email in PHP
  66. Creating a Credit Card Validation Class With PHP
  67. Using Regular Expressions in PHP
  68. Generating Spreadsheets with PHP and PEAR
  69. Getting Started with PEAR – PHP’s Low Hanging Fruit
  70. PHP Basic Pagination

HTTP status codes

When a request is made to your server for a page on your site (for instance, when a user accesses your page in a browser or when Googlebot crawls the page), your server returns an HTTP status code in response to the request.

This status code provides information about the status of the request. This status code gives Googlebot information about your site and the requested page.

Some common status codes are:

  • 200 – the server successfully returned the page
  • 404 – the requested page doesn’t exist
  • 503 – the server is temporarily unavailable

A complete list of HTTP status codes is below. Click the link for more information. You can also visit the W3C page on HTTP status codes for more information.

1xx (Provisional response)
Status codes that indicate a provisional response and require the requestor to take action to continue.

Code Description
100 (Continue) The requestor should continue with the request. The server returns this code to indicate that it has received the first part of a request and is waiting for the rest.
101 (Switching protocols) The requestor has asked the server to switch protocols and the server is acknowledging that it will do so.

2xx (Successful)

Status codes that indicate that the server successfully processed the request.

Code Description
200 (Successful) The server successfully processed the request. Generally, this means that the server provided the requested page. If you see this status for your robots.txt file, it means that Googlebot retrieved it successfully.
201 (Created) The request was successful and the server created a new resource.
202 (Accepted) The server has accepted the request, but hasn’t yet processed it.
203 (Non-authoritative information) The server successfully processed the request, but is returning information that may be from another source.
204 (No content) The server successfully processed the request, but isn’t returning any content.
205 (Reset content) The server successfully proccessed the request, but isn’t returning any content. Unlike a 204 response, this response requires that the requestor reset the document view (for instance, clear a form for new input).
206 (Partial content) The server successfully processed a partial GET request.

3xx (Redirected)
Further action is needed to fulfill the request. Often, these status codes are used for redirection. Google recommends that you use fewer than five redirects for each request. You can use Webmaster Tools to see if Googlebot is having trouble crawling your redirected pages. The Crawl errors page under Diagnostics lists URLs that Googlebot was unable to crawl due to redirect errors.

Code Description
300 (Multiple choices) The server has several actions available based on the request. The server may choose an action based on the requestor (user agent) or the server may present a list so the requestor can choose an action.
301 (Moved permanently) The requested page has been permanently moved to a new location. When the server returns this response (as a response to a GET or HEAD request), it automatically forwards the requestor to the new location. You should use this code to let Googlebot know that a page or site has permanently moved to a new location.
302 (Moved temporarily) The server is currently responding to the request with a page from a different location, but the requestor should continue to use the original location for future requests. This code is similar to a 301 in that for a GET or HEAD request, it automatically forwards the requestor to a different location, but you shouldn’t use it to tell the Googlebot that a page or site has moved because Googlebot will continue to crawl and index the original location.
303 (See other location) The server returns this code when the requestor should make a separate GET request to a different location to retrieve the response. For all requests other than a HEAD request, the server automatically forwards to the other location.
304 (Not modified) The requested page hasn’t been modified since the last request. When the server returns this response, it doesn’t return the contents of the page.

You should configure your server to return this response (called the If-Modified-Since HTTP header) when a page hasn’t changed since the last time the requestor asked for it. This saves you bandwidth and overhead because your server can tell Googlebot that a page hasn’t changed since the last time it was crawled

.

305 (Use proxy) The requestor can only access the requested page using a proxy. When the server returns this response, it also indicates the proxy that the requestor should use.
307 (Temporary redirect) The server is currently responding to the request with a page from a different location, but the requestor should continue to use the original location for future requests. This code is similar to a 301 in that for a GET or HEAD request, it automatically forwards the requestor to a different location, but you shouldn’t use it to tell the Googlebot that a page or site has moved because Googlebot will continue to crawl and index the original location.

4xx (Request error)
These status codes indicate that there was likely an error in the request which prevented the server from being able to process it.

Code Description
400 (Bad request) The server didn’t understand the syntax of the request.
401 (Not authorized) The request requires authentication. The server might return this response for a page behind a login.
403 (Forbidden) The server is refusing the request. If you see that Googlebot received this status code when trying to crawl valid pages of your site (you can see this on the Web crawl page under Diagnostics in Google Webmaster Tools), it’s possible that your server or host is blocking Googlebot’s access.
404 (Not found) The server can’t find the requested page. For instance, the server often returns this code if the request is for a page that doesn’t exist on the server.

If you don’t have a robots.txt file on your site and see this status on the robots.txt page of the Diagnostic tab in Google Webmaster Tools, this is the correct status. However, if you do have a robots.txt file and you see this status, then your robots.txt file may be named incorrectly or in the wrong location. (It should be at the top-level of the domain and named robots.txt.)

If you see this status for URLs that Googlebot tried to crawl (on the HTTP errors page of the Diagnostic tab), then Googlebot likely followed an invalid link from another page (either an old link or a mistyped one).

405 (Method not allowed) The method specified in the request is not allowed.
406 (Not acceptable) The requested page can’t respond with the content characteristics requested.
407 (Proxy authentication required) This status code is similar 401 (Not authorized); but specifies that the requestor has to authenticate using a proxy. When the server returns this response, it also indicates the proxy that the requestor should use.
408 (Request timeout) The server timed out waiting for the request.
409 (Conflict) The server encountered a conflict fulfilling the request. The server must include information about the conflict in the response. The server might return this code in response to a PUT request that conflicts with an earlier request, along with a list of differences between the requests.
410 (Gone) The server returns this response when the requested resource has been permanently removed. It is similar to a 404 (Not found) code, but is sometimes used in the place of a 404 for resources that used to exist but no longer do. If the resource has permanently moved, you should use a 301 to specify the resource’s new location.
411 (Length required) The server won’t accept the request without a valid Content-Length header field.
412 (Precondition failed) The server doesn’t meet one of the preconditions that the requestor put on the request.
413 (Request entity too large) The server can’t process the request because it is too large for the server to handle.
414 (Requested URI is too long) The requested URI (typically, a URL) is too long for the server to process.
415 (Unsupported media type) The request is in a format not support by the requested page.
416 (Requested range not satisfiable) The server returns this status code if the request is for a range not available for the page.
417 (Expectation failed) The server can’t meet the requirements of the Expect request-header field.

5xx (Server error)
These status codes indicate that the server had an internal error when trying to process the request. These errors tend to be with the server itself, not with the request.

Code Description
500 (Internal server error) The server encountered an error and can’t fulfill the request.
501 (Not implemented) The server doesn’t have the functionality to fulfill the request. For instance, the server might return this code when it doesn’t recognize the request method.
502 (Bad gateway) The server was acting as a gateway or proxy and received an invalid response from the upstream server.
503 (Service unavailable) The server is currently unavailable (because it is overloaded or down for maintenance). Generally, this is a temporary state.
504 (Gateway timeout) The server was acting as a gateway or proxy and didn’t receive a timely request from the upstream server.
505 (HTTP version not supported) The server doesn’t support the HTTP protocol version used in the request.

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