30+ Useful WordPress Plugins

A WordPress Plugin is a program, or a set of one or more functions, written in the PHP scripting language, that adds a specific set of features or services to the WordPress weblog, which can be seamlessly integrated with the weblog using access points and methods provided by the WordPress Plugin Application Program Interface (API).

There are tons of WordPress plugins out there. Some of them can be really helpful, while others are just a waste of disk space. Let’s take a look at 32 really useful WordPress plugins and why you should use them.

1. Google XML Sitemaps

2. All in One SEO Pack

3. WordPress Database Backup

4. Contact Form 7

5. Google Analytics for WordPress

6. PXS Mail Form

7. WP e-Commerce

8. ShareThis

9. Redirection

10. Yet Another Related Posts Plugin

11. Sidebar Widgets

12. Get Recent Comments

13. Akismet

14. WP lightbox 2

15. Ultimate Tag Warrior 3

16. My Page Order

17. Adsense-Deluxe

18. Search Regex Plugin

19. Tweetmeme

20. WP-SpamFree Anti-Spam

21. Theme Authenticity Checker

22. List Category Posts

23. Expanding Text Plugin

24. Actionable

25. Advanced Tagline

26. Sodahead Polls

27. Minimum Comment Length

28. Blogging Tips

29. Gravatar Recent Comments

30. WordPress Super Cache

31. WPtouch: WordPress on iPhone, iPod & Android

32. Blog Alerts

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15 jquery slider plugin

I found these plugins very useful for the web development. so i  am sharing

1.  jQuery plugin – Easy Image or Content Slider | Css Globe

2.  Scroll your HTML with jquery scrollable

3.  Creating a Slick Auto-Playing Featured Content Slider

4.  Accessible News Slider: A jQuery Plugin

5.  s3Slider jQuery plugin – Overview

6.  Create a Slick and Accessible Slideshow Using jQuery

7. jQuery Image Gallery/News Slider with Caption

8. New jQuery plugin: imgPreview – James Padolsey

9. CrossSlide – A jQuery plugin to create pan and cross-fade animations

10. JQuery Cycle Plugin

11. Simple jQuery Image Slideshow with Semi Transparent Caption

12. Slider Gallery

13. Create Beautiful jQuery Slider

14. Supersized

15. Smooth Div Scroll

24+ list of colour tools and resources to get you started

Colour Schemes

Colour Charts

Colour Pickers

Colour Tools

WordPress Colour and CSS Test Sites

70 PHP Tutorials at Its best

  1. Introduction To PHP
  2. Using HTML Forms With PHP
  3. Adding records to a MySQL database using PHP
  4. Setting Up Apache, PHP & MySQL On Windows
  5. Creating a PHP Looping Statement
  6. Introduction to PHP Variables
  7. Using PHP Operators
  8. Using Variable Referencing
  9. Working with PHP Datatypes
  10. File I/O in PHP
  11. What is Object Oriented Programming (OOP)?
  12. Convert Images to Thumbnails Images Using PHP
  13. PHP by example, Part I
  14. PHP By Example, Part 2
  15. Sorting an Array in PHP
  16. Putting PHP & MySQL To Work
  17. Generate Random Quotes with PHP
  18. How To Upload Files Using PHP
  19. A Class for Validating and Formatting Dates
  20. How Many Users Online?
  21. How to Show Random Images from a Folder
  22. Replacing Text in a MySQL Database Using PHP
  23. How To Backup Your MySQL Database With PHP
  24. Google Suggest With PHP
  25. Track Your Visitors, Using PHP
  26. PHP and Cookies, A Good Mix!
  27. Control Structures and While Loops
  28. Hightlight or Censor Words in PHP
  29. How to make a Hit Counter with PHP
  30. Basic Control Structures in PHP
  31. Developing a Login System with PHP and MySQL
  32. Upload Files to MySQL using PHP Tutorial
  33. PHP and MySql with PayPal
  34. Inserting An Array Into A Database
  35. Calculating Difference Between Two Dates Using PHP
  36. Programmatically Deciding Which Database to Connect in PHP
  37. Saving PHP Session Data to a Database
  38. Using Control Structures and Foreach Loops in PHP
  39. Storing Images in a Database
  40. Displaying Load Time with PHP
  41. Creating and Accessing MySQL Data with PHP
  42. Developing a Login System with PHP and MySQL
  43. Site Personalization With PHP
  44. How to Handle a Many-to-Many Relationship with PHP and MySQL
  45. Using PHP Objects to Access Your Database Tables (Part 1)
  46. Using PHP Objects to Access Your Database Tables (Part 2)
  47. The Explode Function, Split a String by String
  48. PHP Caching to Speed up Dynamically Generated Sites
  49. How to Setup and use Printing Variables in PHP
  50. Creating an Image Gallery with PHP
  51. Anti-Automated Registration
  52. Creating a Drop Down Selection with an Array
  53. Customizing the PHP Error Handler
  54. Checking Form Field Integrity within PHP
  55. Password Protection and File Inclusion With PHP
  56. How to Setup Variable Scope and Global Declarations
  57. Creating Dynamic Text Images
  58. Perfect PHP Pagination
  59. Image Manipulation with PHP The GD Libraries
  60. Simplified Image Resizing with PHP
  61. Verify a User’s Email Address Using PHP –
  62. Storing Hierarchical Data in a Database
  63. Managing Users with PHP Sessions and MySQL
  64. Generate PDFs with PHP
  65. Advanced email in PHP
  66. Creating a Credit Card Validation Class With PHP
  67. Using Regular Expressions in PHP
  68. Generating Spreadsheets with PHP and PEAR
  69. Getting Started with PEAR – PHP’s Low Hanging Fruit
  70. PHP Basic Pagination

Ten steps to learn CSS positioning

1. position:static

The default positioning for all elements is position:static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document.

Normally you wouldn’t specify this unless you needed to override a positioning that had been previously set.

#div-1 {
 position:static;
}

2. position:relative

If you specify position:relative, then you can use top or bottom, and left or right to move the element relative to where it would normally occur in the document.

Let’s move div-1 down 20 pixels, and to the left 40 pixels:

#div-1 {
 position:relative;
 top:20px;
 left:-40px;
}

Notice the space where div-1 normally would have been if we had not moved it: now it is an empty space. The next element (div-after) did not move when we moved div-1. That’s because div-1 still occupies that original space in the document, even though we have moved it.

It appears that position:relative is not very useful, but it will perform an important task later in this tutorial.

3. position:absolute

When you specify position:absolute, the element is removed from the document and placed exactly where you tell it to go.

Let’s move div-1a to the top right of the page:

#div-1a {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 right:0;
 width:200px;
}

Notice that this time, since div-1a was removed from the document, the other elements on the page were positioned differently: div-1b, div-1c, and div-after moved up since div-1a was no longer there.

Also notice that div-1a was positioned in the top right corner of the page. It’s nice to be able to position things directly the page, but it’s of limited value.

What I really want is to position div-1a relative to div-1. And that’s where relative position comes back into play.

Footnotes

  • There is a bug in the Windows IE browser: if you specify a relative width (like “width:50%”) then the width will be based on the parent element instead of on the positioning element.

4. position:relative + position:absolute

If we set relative positioning on div-1, any elements within div-1 will be positioned relative to div-1. Then if we set absolute positioning on div-1a, we can move it to the top right of div-1:

#div-1 {
 position:relative;
}
#div-1a {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 right:0;
 width:200px;
}

5. two column absolute

Now we can make a two-column layout using relative and absolute positioning!

#div-1 {
 position:relative;
}
#div-1a {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 right:0;
 width:200px;
}
#div-1b {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 left:0;
 width:200px;
}

One advantage to using absolute positioning is that we can position the elements in any order on the page, regardless of the order they appear in the HTML. So I put div-1b before div-1a.

But wait – what happened to the other elements? They are being obscured by the absolutely positioned elements. What can we do about that?

6. two column absolute height

One solution is to set a fixed height on the elements.

But that is not a viable solution for most designs, because we usually do not know how much text will be in the elements, or the exact font sizes that will be used.

#div-1 {
 position:relative;
 height:250px;
}
#div-1a {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 right:0;
 width:200px;
}
#div-1b {
 position:absolute;
 top:0;
 left:0;
 width:200px;
}

7. float

For variable height columns, absolute positioning does not work, so let’s come up with another solution.

We can “float” an element to push it as far as possible to the right or to the left, and allow text to wrap around it. This is typically used for images, but we will use it for more complex layout tasks (because it’s the only tool we have).

#div-1a {
 float:left;
 width:200px;
}

8. float columns

If we float one column to the left, then also float the second column to the left, they will push up against each other.

#div-1a {
 float:left;
 width:150px;
}
#div-1b {
 float:left;
 width:150px;
}

9. float columns with clear

Then after the floating elements we can “clear” the floats to push down the rest of the content.

#div-1a {
 float:left;
 width:190px;
}
#div-1b {
 float:left;
 width:190px;
}
#div-1c {
 clear:both;
}

10. Disclaimer & Resources

These examples are extremely simplified and do not trigger some of the CSS bugs in the Windows IE browser (of which there are many).

The 9 Most Common Browser Error Messages

Browser error messages appear in all browsers, like Internet Explorer, FireFox, etc. Browser error messages are actually called HTTP status codes and appear when there is some kind of error loading the web page.

The most common browser error messages are listed below with helpful tips to help you get past them and on to the web page you were looking for.

400: Bad Request

The 400 Bad Request browser error means that the request you sent to the website server (i.e. a request to load a web page) was somehow malformed therefore the server was unable to understand or process the request.

zSB(3,3)

401: Unauthorized

The 401 Unauthorized browser error means the page you were trying to access can not be loaded until you first log on with a valid user ID and password. If you have just logged on and received the 401 Unauthorized error, it means that the credentials you entered were invalid.

Invalid credentials could mean that you don’t have an account with the web site, your user ID was entered incorrectly, or you password was incorrect.

403: Forbidden

The 403 Forbidden browser error means that accessing the page or resource you were trying to reach is absolutely forbidden.

404: Not Found

The 404 Not Found browser error means that the page you were trying to reach could not be found on the web site’s server. This is the most popular browser error message that you will probably see. This browser error message also often appears as The page cannot be found.

408: Request Timeout

The 408 Request Timeout browser error means the request you sent to the website server (i.e. a request to load a web page) took longer than the website’s server was prepared to wait. In other words, your connection with the web site “timed out”.

500: Internal Server Error

The 500 Internal Server Error is a very general browser error meaning something has gone wrong on the web site’s server but the server could not be more specific on what the exact problem is.

502: Bad Gateway

The 502 Bad Gateway browser error means that one server received an invalid response from another server that it was accessing while attempting to load the web page or fill another request by the browser.

503: Service Unavailable

The 503 Service Unavailable browser error means the web site’s server is simply not available at the moment. This is usually due to a temporary overloading or maintenance of the server.

504: Gateway Timeout

The 504 Gateway Timeout browser error means that one server did not receive a timely response from another server that it was accessing while attempting to load the web page or fill another request by the browser. This usually means that the other server is down or not working properly.

Copied from about.com

Why a CSS website layout will make you money

Although CSS layouts have been around for years, they haven’t become so commonplace until recently. This was basically due to limited browser support (especially from Netscape 4) – nowadays though, CSS 2.0 (which introduced positioning) is compatible with over 99% of browsers out there (check out the browser stats over at The Counter5).

So, why should you convert your website from its current table-based layout to a CSS layout? It’ll make you money. Simple really. And here’s four reasons to explain why:

Reduced bandwidth costs

Web pages using CSS for layout tend to have much smaller file sizes than those using tabular layouts. It’s not unusual to see reductions of 50% or more in file size when switching from tables to CSS. Smaller file sizes obviously mean reduced bandwidth costs, which for high traffic sites can mean enormous savings.

The main reason for this dramatic decrease in file size is that presentation information is placed in the external CSS document, called up once when the homepage loads up and then cached (stored) on to the user’s computer. Table layouts on the other hand, place all presentation information inside each HTML, which is then called up and downloaded for every page on the site.

Additionally, CSS can be used to replace JavaScript image rollovers, again allowing a large reduction in overall page size. See the article, CSS navigation menu6 for more on this.

A higher search engine ranking

A CSS-based website will appear higher in the search engine rankings for three reasons:

  • The code is cleaner and therefore more accessible to search engines
  • Important content can be placed at the top of the HTML document
  • There is a greater density of content compared to coding

A higher search engine ranking means more site visitors, which, provided your website is usable, should lead to an increase in enquiries or sales.

Faster download speed

A faster download speed will make you money? Well, yes. Slow download speed is often cited as one of the biggest usability complaints for websites. A faster download speed therefore leads to increased usability, and a web usability redesign can increase the sales/conversion rate by 100% (source: Jakob Nielsen15).

CSS downloads faster than tables because:

  • Browsers read through tables twice before displaying their contents, once to work out their structure and once to determine their content
  • Tables appear on the screen all in one go – no part of the table will appear until the entire table is downloaded and rendered
  • Tables encourage the use of spacer images to aid with positioning
  • CSS generally requires less code than cumbersome tables
  • All code to do with the layout can be placed in an external CSS document, which will be called up just once and then cached (stored) on the user’s computer; table layout, stored in each HTML document, must be loaded up each time a new page downloads
  • With CSS you can control the order items download on to the screen – make the content appear before slow-loading images and your site users will definitely appreciate it

Increase in reach

The more people you can reach, the more visitors you’ll get to your site and the more enquiries or sales you should get. A CSS-based website is compatible with PDAs, mobile phones, in-car browsers and WebTV. Don’t underestimate the importance of this: In 2008 alone an estimated 58 million PDAs will be sold (source: eTForecast16) and one third of the world’s population will own a wireless device.

You can make an additional CSS document specifically for handheld devices, which will be called up in place of the regular CSS document, thereby ensuring your website is accessible to this lucrative market. This isn’t possible with a tabular layout.

Conclusion: Switch to CSS!

Switching your website from a table layout to a CSS layout can be a long, arduous process, especially for large websites. Given the money making possibilities though, it could very well prove to be well worth it.

This article was written by Trenton Moss. Trenton’s crazy about web usability and accessibility – so crazy that he founded Webcredible, an industry-leading user experience consultancy17, helping to make the Internet a better place for everyone. He’s very good at running CSS training13 and spends much of his time working on the world’s most accessible CMS18.

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